Quantcast Caretaking Parents, Entitled Kids | Parenting | Moms | MyDailymoment.com
Home >> Moms >> Parenting >> Caretaking Parents, Entitled Kids
Friday, August 01, 2014

Featured Quizzes

What's Your Zodiac IQ? When it comes to astrology IQ, can you pass the test?
Take Quiz
What's Your Depression IQ? What do you know about this debilitating disorder?
Take Quiz
What's Your Fashion IQ? Does the devil really wear Prada? Find out...
Take Quiz

Caretaking Parents, Entitled Kids

By Margaret Paul
Rate:
(3 votes )

RELATED TAGS:
control  entitlement  family  feelings  love  loving relationships  parenting  parenting advice  parenting mistakes  relationship  relationships  spoil 
SPONSORED:

Demanding children - children who have entitlement issues - seem to be common these days. Like the obnoxious child, Veruca Salt in Willy Wonka And The Chocolate Factory, who was constantly demanding that her father get her whatever she wanted ("I want an Umpa Lumpa! Get it for me NOW!"), we hear many children today uttering the fairly constant refrain, "I want ... ! Give it to me! Get it for me, now!" They seem to be masters at instilling guilt in their parents through phrases such as "It's not fair!" or "You don't love me!" or "What about what I want?", or by getting angry, shutting down or crying piteously.

Why are there so many demanding children?

Olivia grew up with a self-centered demanding critical mother who never let her have her feelings. Olivia learned early to take responsibility for her mother's feelings by being a good girl. Now, as a parent herself, and not wanting to do to her children what her mother did to her, she has gone the other way. Rather than being demanding and self-centered, she is compliant and self-sacrificing. Rather than being an authoritarian parent like her mother was, she is a permissive parent, giving in to her children's demands rather than setting appropriate limits.

Olivia tends to give much too much credence to her children's feelings. All they need to do is be upset about something and she stops what she is doing to attend to them. They have learned to use their feelings of hurt, irritation and anger as a means of control. Olivia thinks she is being loving when she makes it "safe" for her children to express their feelings. The problem is she is not discerning the difference between having feelings and using feelings as a means of control. Because she gives her children's feelings so much importance, her children have learned to use their feelings against her.

Olivia's children need to learn to care about Olivia instead of just trying to get her to give herself up to meet their demands. The only way they will learn to care about her is if she learns to care about herself.

Demanding children are difficult to be around. They have a hard time keeping friends and as adults they create chaotic relationships. So let's take a hard look at what we need to do to support caring in children rather than self-centeredness. Authoritarian parenting often creates compliant/caretaking children, while permissive parenting seems to create narcissistic children. Neither authoritarian nor permissive parenting is loving parenting - parenting that supports the highest good of both children and parents. Let's break the cycle of creating caretakers and takers. As parents, we need to learn to:

 
Page [1] 2  | Next ›
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment

busy
shadow